The Drums You Have Heard 1,000 Times

One six second drum loop has been sampled and used in countless records.  In 1969 a band called the Winstons cut a song called Amen, Brother.  A part of that track has been used in everything from old school hip hop, a David Bowie song, and commercials.  Knowing this raises interesting questions about intellectual property.  The above video tells the partial history of this break beat.  The video is fairly interesting despite the announcer speaking in a Stephen Hawking monotone voice.  Probably the quote I find the most interesting is, and this is a paraphrase:  A whole subculture has been created out of six seconds in 1969.

For All My Sisters Review

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I really like the new Cribs album For All My Sisters a lot.  It’s pop music in the best sense.  Pop music as played by rock band.  Despite the fact that the band is from England, there is something California about their new record.  If not for the accents on the vocals, there is something about this record that can be traced on a musical family tree back to certain elements of Weezer and even the Beach Boys.  I’m not saying that is intentional, or that there aren’t stylistic differences, only that there is a melodic sense that is somehow sunny and often melancholy a the same time.

The album is produced by Ric Ocasek who also produced Weezer’s Blue and Green albums, and also their excellent new album Everything Will Be Alright In the End.  As I said, there are definitely some melodic moments that recall Weezer, although The Cribs have been delivering great melodies since the start of their career.  However, while Weezer, for the most part, have an easy mass appeal, despite their idiosyncrasies, The Cribs new album is more cryptic.  Despite being melodic, the guitars are more jagged, more angular.  Even their extremely melodic vocal hooks are more elusive, less singsongy.  This is rock n roll pop music filtered through British post-punk.

One of the things that Ric Ocasek does time and time again is get great guitar tones.  He does this without doing anything seemingly complex.  Aside from a couple of synth parts and extra backup vocals, there is almost nothing on this album that the three piece Cribs could not reproduce live.  Hearing a guitar overdub that plays something different than the main guitar line is rare.  Mostly it just sounds like one guitar part doubled.  If you listen to this album, the Weezer albums, or even the Bad Brains God of Love, Ocasek is able to create deep textures through guitar distortion.  He is able to take something incredibly simple and turn it into an aural painting.  Where guitars can often sound flat, he creates an incredible amount of depth, a warm swimming pool that the listener can pleasurably dive into.  This is a big deal, especially for a three piece band.

Despite the album being full of hooks, there is not anything as instantly memorable as earlier Cribs records.  There is no song that has a chorus as memorable as the song We Share the Same Skies, for instance.  This doesn’t necessarily work against it, as the album holds up on repeated plays.  The album is enjoyable on the first listen, but it is definitely a grower.  I know that I have said several times that is is incredibly melodic, and it is true that the album has very glossy production, but there is a slight sense of artiness here, just below the surface, that keeps the album from being swallowed too easily.

If I had to criticize anything, it would be that the lyrics haven’t really opened themselves up to me yet.  That’s not to say that they are bad or unintelligent.  They do not get in the way of my enjoyment either.  It’s just that, despite the album having a classic rock mix, the vocals are not buried like they are on many other indie rock records, the vocals seem part of the music more than the centerpiece.

The Cribs have consistently been at that crossroad where indie, pop, rock, and post-punk collide.  I am partial to this kind of music, but I think anyone that likes to hear guitar oriented rock music with great melodies would like this as well.  They are not doing anything groundbreaking, but they put the ingredients together in a unique way that gives them their own sound and personality.  The fact that they do have their own personality does mean they are able to expand the form on the margins, and that alone is worth something.

Shinyribs New Album Release

Shinyribs Album Cover

The new Shinyribs album Okra Candy is now officially coming out April 14th.  I played bass on 7 of the 10 tracks and cowrote one of them.  I think this is the best Shinyribs album yet, due to Kev’s writing, great performances, and production that makes the most out of each track.  Stay tuned!

Looking Back On Random Access Memories

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Daft Punk Random Access Memories Article

One of the few popular records that I think truly merited the acclaim directed at it in recent years was Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories.  It’s a record that I never tire of.  The above article is a long form article from Pitchfork at the time of that album’s release.  It’s hard to believe it is already almost two years since it came out.  An interesting read if you are curious about the group at all. A sample:

Just as their costumes put up a physical boundary between themselves and their audience, Daft Punk enjoy a “total separation” between their private and public lives, which is precisely what they want. “We don’t talk about our private lives because they’re private,” says Bangalter with a laugh. “Plus, the public image is more fun and entertaining anyway.” Instead of desiring traditional fame and worldwide recognition, Bangalter says they’re more interested in “changing the world without anybody knowing who we are, which is a very different ego fantasy, and it seems to be the premise for much more exciting developments.”

“Usually, the 24-hour, high-maintenance celebrity lifestyle can disconnect people from reality,” he continues. “And after a band has been making records for 20 years, they’re not doing the most interesting shit because they fall into this bourgeois, successful, settled existence.”

The The – This is the Day

I’m a big The The fan, especially of the album Mind Bomb.  Anyone that is interested in extremely intelligent pop music should get that album.  (Being a huge Johnny Marr fan doesn’t hurt as he plays on that album and the following album Dusk.  Don’t be mistaken though, The The is Matt Johnson’s show and his lyrics distinct ear for arrangements are really what separates The The from other musical acts.)  However, the song This is the Day, from their album Soul Mining, is a musical masterpiece.  I love the use of accordion over melodic British pop music.  It’s a unique combination.

The Cribs – For All My Sisters

Looking forward to hearing The Cribs new album For All My Sisters.  Their album Ignore the Ignorant was one of my favorite guitar rock records of recent years.  All their work is solid.  This time out they worked with producer Ric Ocasek.  Above is the single Burning for No One.  Here is the album artwork:

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My Wild One by Thin Lizzy

My Wild One

I will be on the road most of the day today.  Headed to a festival in Florida.  If I can get more posted from the road I will.  In the meanwhile above is Phil Lynott and the timeless Thin Lizzy to start your day right.  Their album run from Fighting through Black Rose is as good as any rock band’s.  And all of their albums have things to recommend them.  If Lynott had lived, who knows, who knows…