This is Pil Review

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If you want a recent album that dances to its own strange logic, check out the Public Image Ltd. album This is Pil.  It came out in 2012 and I shamefully admit that I am only grasping it in its full glory now.  John Lydon’s PIL collective has issued its fair share of ground breaking moments, from Metal Box to The Flowers of Romance.  It isn’t as easy to break ground in today’s music business, but this album creates its own aura.  

First of all Lydon (Johnny Rotten) is fine form.  His lyrics range from direct political attacks to the completely surreal.  “England has died”, he sings on one song, while on another he sings, “You wanna see me mushroom.”  In a song called Lollipop Opera you have a good idea what kind of mushrooms he is singing.  This is festival music.  It is meant to challenge and be enjoyed by large groups of people.  If Terry Gilliam made a record, well you get the idea.  It is subversive and fantastic.  David Lynch inspired dread also comes to mind on a few songs. This is the most dread infused PIL album since This is What You Want…This is What You Get.

For the first time in a long time PIL sounds like a band.  The rhythm section plays giant dubby parts like early pil.  Lu Edmonds,  formerly of The Damned, as well as an earlier incarnation of PIL, plays guitar and a multitude of instruments in the higher frequencies.   His playing is truly something to behold.  Listen to Deeper Water, maybe the best track on the album, as his playing on that song is magisterial.  

This album is not an older band cashing in.  It is as vibrant and hungry as any new band out there, pushing the boundaries of what music can do. 

If I have any criticism of this album it is only that the first track, which is the weakest, goes on too long.  But overall this is a true return to form that not only doesn’t tarnish the band’s legacy, but expands upon it. 

The album sounds mostly live, with a minimum amount of overdubs and studio effects.  There is just enough added to each track to add some interesting textures, without taking the focus off of the four piece unit. 

This album is not for everyone.  Lydon and his cohorts are not afraid to create sounds and dabble in ideas that are uncomfortable at times.  However, those that are brave enough to take the journey will find a small piece of uncharted territory to visit. 

Favorite Tracks:
One Drop
Deeper Water
Human
Out of the Woods

Pet Cemetery Video

I’ve got to jet out to a rehearsal.  In the meantime, in honor of Halloween approaching, here is the Ramones video for Pet Cemetery.  I learned how to play guitar by playing along to Ramones records.  This movie used to also scare the bejesus out of me as a kid.  Alas, now I would gladly dance with the awoken dead of Pet Cemetery if it came between that and seeing Ted Cruz’s face one more time.

Invest In What You Value

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I just read that record sales are down 14% this year.  It is a shame, because this has actually been a year when a fair amount of good to great records have been released.  I don’t understand, especially in a capitalist system, why people don’t understand the idea that artists near to be paid for their work.  I mean I think creative people will create no matter how much money they are making.  However, if people are investing in their work they will create more and possibly do more groundbreaking work, as making records takes money.  Making records that really push the boundaries of what recorded sound can do really takes money!  The more you stream or steal, the more you are just going to end up with pop being just elevator music.  Music that sounds good in car commercials.  Those that make car commercial music are rewarded more than those that make great albums.  How sad is that?!!!  So if you want there to be a large amount of decent music being made, invest in artists.  That is the deal, someone makes something you like that inspires you, spend ten dollars investing in their work.  Then there is the possibility that they will make something else that inspires you.  That might not always be the case, but anything you invest in has a slight amount of risk involved.  In Canada artists often get grants from the government when they start out.  That is not going to happen here, not for a long time if ever, in the world of pop music anyway.  We need individuals to step up to the plate.  Stealing is stealing anyway you cut it, and streaming isn’t paying out like selling records is yet.  So there you go, you know who you are?  If you value something make a small investment in something.  It will lead to more things that you value.

Jimmy Cliff World Upside Down

One of the best albums in recent years is Jimmy Cliff’s Rebirth.  It is the full package with an artist at the top of their game.  It is political, emotional, soulful, and absolutely fearless.  The production by Tim Armstrong is note perfect.  Somehow Jimmy Cliff can sing as powerfully now as he ever did.  This live performance on Jools Holland is stunning.  If you get the chance also check out the YouTube clip of him performing One More from this same performance in 2012.

Public Image Video

Off to see the canvassing wizard.  I have been reading a lot about John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) recently, including his two books.  I have also been listening to a great deal of Public Image Limited, which is his band after The Sex Pistols.  This is their groundbreaking first single Public Image.  This song was quite influential in the world of post punk.  Listen to the guitar and how similar it is to early U2 for instance.  Extra points for bassist Jah Wobble playing from a chair!

Siouxsie and the Banshees Into the Light

Alright, I need to get off here for the night and disconnect.  I’m exhausted from the trip and my brain is running on overdrive.  I thought some Siouxsie and the Banshees would be a perfect way to end an October night.  The guitar work in this song, by John McGeoch, is simply fantastic, especially in the chorus.

Happy?

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I’ve been diving into my Public Image Ltd. collection.  Today I was listening to the album Happy?.  This album, as well as featuring mainstay John Lydon on vocals, also features John McGeoch and Lou Edmonds, formerly of the Banshees and The Damned respectively.  It’s a strange album.  It’s almost as if space aliens made an 80’s pop record.

I really love the first three Public Image albums.  Those would be First Issue, Metal Box (also known as Second Edition), and The Flowers of Romance.  Don’t make a mistake, if you are not into really bizarre uncomfortable music that is much more about the sound than the songs then you are not going to like these albums.  Metal Box is my favorite.  I love the super low dub-like bass with the high pitched razor blade guitar playing over it.  It’s really unlike anything else in music.  I truly believe they were years ahead of their time on these three releases.  A lot of Radiohead’s more experimental stuff, and much of new indie music that is on the fringe, pales in comparison to just how weird this stuff is.  I’m not saying that negates anything Radiohead or anyone else has done, just simply that in terms of turning pop music inside out, PIL got their first.  If you read early fearful interpretations of what punk sounded like, before it became accepted by the mainstream, and you hadn’t heard any of it, this is what you would think it would sound like, not the melodic primitive rock n roll that it was.

I don’t like Public Image Ltd. because they are strange.  There is plenty of experimental stuff that just sounds like someone going up their own asshole.  Generally as a fan of recorded sound they were doing really interesting groundbreaking stuff.  And the thing about it is, really the first two albums as The Flowers of Romance is its own weird trip, it sounds like a band.  A lot of times when we hear stuff pushing the parameters of sound now it is studio manipulation.  I’m not saying there was none of that on these records, but by and large these were people taking preexisting instruments and playing them in totally unique and interesting ways.  Especially in today’s world, when so much is able to be manipulated through computers, it is exciting to me to think about someone like Keith Levene just taking an electric guitar and making it sound otherworldly just in the way he approached it.

Anyway, so I was listening to Happy? today.  I can’t say it is a great record.  It is not PIL at their best and the keyboard and drum sounds are too 80’s in a way that makes it sound dated, where the first three albums sound outside of time.  However, it is still unique in the arrangements, playing, and singing.  It’s still just bizarre enough that if you visualize things when you listen to music you can almost picture people inhabiting that strange building that is on the front cover.  Again, imagine if aliens had all the technology of an 80’s recording studio, and had seen a little pop music, but didn’t understand it enough to make something that was really human.

If I believed in giving things stars or points, which I don’t, I don’t know how many I’d give it.  It is truly a puzzling recording.  But there aren’t that many I can say that about.  I don’t find it enjoyable in the way that I enjoy most records, but I certainly don’t dislike it either.  It is not great or grand, but it has its own little universe all to itself, and that is some kind of accomplishment isn’t it?